Posted by: C.R. Mooney | March 31, 2011

Common Problem Words and Phrases

I ran into this great article at Daily Writing Tips called 50 Problem Words and Phrases by Mark Nichol, so I thought I would pass it along.  Here is a short excerpt, please click through for the entire article.

50 Problem Words and Phrases

by Mark Nichol

Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to conceive written communication. So many pairs or trios of words and phrases stymie us with their resemblance to each other. Here’s a quick guide to alleviate (or is it ameliorate?) your suffering:

1. a while / awhile: “A while” is a noun phrase; awhile is an adverb.

2. all together / altogether: All together now — “We will refrain from using that two-word phrase to end sentences like this one altogether.”

3. amend / emend: To amend is to change; to emend is to correct.

4. amount / number: Amount refers to a mass (“The amount saved is considerable”); number refers to a quantity (“The number of dollars saved is considerable”).

5. between / among: The distinction is not whether you refer to two people or things or to three or more; it’s whether you refer to one thing and another or to a collective or undefined number — “Walk among the trees,” but “Walk between two trees.”

6. biannual / biennial: Biannual means twice a year; biennial means once every two years.

7. bring / take: If it’s coming toward you, it’s being brought. If it’s headed away from you, it’s being taken.

8. compare to / compare with: “Comparing to” implies similarity alone; “compare with” implies contrast as well.

9. compliment / complement: To compliment is to praise; to complement is to complete.

10. comprise, consist of / compose, constitute: Comprise means “include,” so test by replacement — “is included of” is nonsense, and so is “is comprised of.” The whole comprises the parts or consists of the parts, but the parts compose or constitute the whole.

(click here for the rest of the article)

If you can think of any others that trip you up, please post them in the comments!

 

 


Responses

  1. If I understand oxymoron, I guess that is what I am. In the sense that I am old as a person but new as a writer. Having a nineth grade education the above list is very helpful. Thank you for posting. Blessings, In Jesus


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